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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

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We develop workable approaches to tackle major invasive species threats. We research and implement biological control programmes to deal with problematic invasive species which cause adverse detrimental effects where they are introduced.

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We deliver a range of research and development projects that are solving major invasive species problems around the world. 

Invasives and livelihoods

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Arne Witt with Opuntia stricta in Laikipia

Arne Witt

 Dick Shaw

Dick Shaw

 Sean Murphy

Sean Murphy

Biological control of apple leaf-curling midge in Canada

A European biological control agent may help control an exotic pest of apple trees in western Canada. Damage from the apple leaf-curling midge in eastern Canada was effectively reduced by introducing a European natural enemy, Platygaster demades, in the 1990s. The pest arrived in British Columbia more recently, where releases of P. demades are now... >>

Action on Invasives

Invasive species impact the livelihoods of the rural poor who are dependent on natural resources for income and survival. They also undermine international development investment. CABI is developing an ambitious programme to address this complex problem. We aim to target local, national and regional communities and will work across sectors. We... >>

Biological control of hawkweeds

European hawkweeds are invasive in North American pastures, where they escape mowing and even profit from mechanical disturbance. Chemical control with broad-spectrum herbicides is not selective and is relatively expensive, and hawkweeds may recolonize pastures from untreated areas. Insects that feed on hawkweeds in Europe have been studied as... >>

Revisiting biological control of field bindweed

Field bindweed is a Eurasian vine whose dense creeping and twining growth smothers other vegetation and its long-lived seeds and deep roots make it hard to control. It is a noxious weed of agricultural fields in temperate regions and has become invasive in North America. CABI is studying sustainable control methods using host-specific natural... >>

Biological control of garlic mustard

Crushed garlic mustard leaves and seeds smell like cultivated garlic and have been used as flavouring in cooking for centuries. Garlic mustard is a brassica from Eurasia that was accidentally taken to North America and became invasive in many of its forests. Together with partners, CABI is exploring the possibility of using specially selected and... >>

Invasive species data

Invasive species are causing species extinction. We are trying to address this problem by providing sound scientific information that will be used by endangered species managers to improve their efforts to recover listed and candidate species affected by invasive species. The information will also be used by invasive species managers to control... >>

Biological control of flowering rush

Attractive pink flowers make the Eurasian plant flowering rush a popular aquatic ornamental. But since it was introduced to North America it has become an aggressive invader of freshwater systems in the midwestern/ western USA and western Canada. One likely reason for this is the absence of the natural enemies that keep it in check in its area of... >>